Hormone Therapy after 65 – The North American Menopause Society’s Perspective

Hormone Therapy after 65 – The North American Menopause Society’s Perspective

Hormone Therapy after 65 – The North American Menopause Society’s Perspective
The ultimate recommendation of the society is that ‘Use of HT should be individualized and not discontinued solely based on a woman’s age.’

Many women find that bioidentical hormone replacement therapy brings substantial relief from menopause symptoms. In 2012, the North American Menopause society acknowledged hormone therapy as ‘the most effective treatment for symptoms of menopause’.

More recently the society has focused on the issue of undergoing hormone therapy after the age of 65. Here’s what the society had to say:

  1. Many women over 65 still have menopause-related sleep disturbance

Vasomotor symptoms (night sweats and hot flashes) often persist for women who have severe symptoms, in some cases for more than a decade after symptoms first appear. This can negatively affect quality of life by disrupting sleep and producing ongoing discomfort.

  1. In some cases, extending hormone therapy past the usual cut-off age is advised

The North American Menopause Society, in their publication Menopause (Vol. 22, No. 7 2015), acknowledge that there are health risks associated with continuing hormone therapy beyond the age of 60. Yet they also suggest that if a woman is aware of these risk factors (risks that include higher Alzheimer’s disease and cancer incidence), she could continue taking hormones if the benefits outweigh the severity of the potential risks. The ultimate recommendation of the society is that ‘Use of HT should be individualized and not discontinued solely based on a woman’s age.’

What does this mean for you?

If you are a mature woman who is soon to start taking bioidentical hormones or you have been on hormones for some time, speak to your doctor about your options regarding continuing/discontinuing therapy. Because your individual health profile is unique (including hereditary risk factors), your doctor will be able to provide guidance on the best course of action. As the Menopause Society states, ‘The decision to continue or discontinue HT should be made jointly by the woman and her healthcare provider.’

Do you want to find out more about bioidentical hormone replacement therapy? Get in touch with Doctor Allie today and schedule a consultation.

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